Trying some culinary adventuresome treats. #meandlouie #memphis #carnivalfood #gastronomicallyadventerous

Trying some culinary adventuresome treats. #meandlouie #memphis #carnivalfood #gastronomicallyadventerous

Look at the Hardy Boys! They started out as kid detectives just solving mysteries in Bayport and now they have an entire book series about them!”

This man.

(Source: jake-peralta, via hannibalhannibal)

Because everyone loves reading, especially when it’s a great book like Persepolis. #persepolis #justreadgp #grizzliesprep #memphis

Because everyone loves reading, especially when it’s a great book like Persepolis. #persepolis #justreadgp #grizzliesprep #memphis

Because anytime I’m having a bad day, I simply ask myself, “WWSD?”

Because anytime I’m having a bad day, I simply ask myself, “WWSD?”

(Source: trebleinthegarden, via thiefontherun)

fallontonight:

Brian Williams Raps “Gin and Juice”

NBC Nightly News managing editor and anchor Brian Williams raps Snoop Dogg’s classic “Gin and Juice.”

(via popculturebrain)

coelacanthteeth:

never ever apologize to me for your dog being too excited to see me

a dog could knock me to the ground and give me a black eye and I would still hug it and love it because dogs hurt because they love too much I love dogs

(Source: princemotorcycle, via savingsweetness)

humansofnewyork:

"Do you remember the saddest moment of your life?""Probably sitting at the kitchen table with my dad, an hour after my mother died, realizing we had to figure out what we were going to do for lunch."

This hits close to home.

humansofnewyork:

"Do you remember the saddest moment of your life?"
"Probably sitting at the kitchen table with my dad, an hour after my mother died, realizing we had to figure out what we were going to do for lunch."

This hits close to home.

thechanelmuse:

theamazingariel:

MIA is entirely too turnt

This video is still on a whole nother level

(via keshiababyy)

moltovomito:

Happy Easter

moltovomito:

Happy Easter

(via robdelaney)

Learning how to take care of hair.

Growing up, my mom always emphasized how much she envied mine and my sister’s hair. My dad has really fine pelochino as we called it— straight black thin locks that were a breeze to maintain. I took after him more so than my sister, who had more of a mixture of my parents hair. 

I was always so jealous of her— the way it curled and retained that wafty shampoo smell and was so dark and wild. Mine always sat limp on my shoulders, greasing up around the scalp before the day’s end. 

My mom wore her hair natural maybe 4-5 times in my life. It was coarse, strong, and beautifully curly. She dyed it, blew it dry, used hot curlers on a daily basis, and tried every frizz tamer known to man. Anytime I’d watch all the effort her and my sister put into their hair, the hours they’d spend straightening, moisturizing, dying, and attempting to tame their locks, I’d grow more and more jealous, wishing my hair could match in some way. 

Of course, I was lucky if my hair showed one slight curl near the ends. I think part of me wished I was more stereotypically Hispanic looking growing up. I was confused for anything from Russian to Hawaiian to Greek. Unless I left the dirty Dade, I never once heard someone identify me as part of the tribe. 

As an adult, and living in Memphis, an almost frighteningly homogenized place of racial boundaries, I stick out like a sore thumb. When I first started teaching, my female students begged to touch my hair, asking me when I’d wear it natural, not understanding that this was as natural as my hair got. Suddenly my hair was somehow desirable, a thought I’d never had. 

I’ve got about a month left before Baby Arcelia gets here. Chances are, given mine and Louie’s genes, she’s gonna have wild curly hair. I want her to know that even though her hair might not look like mine, it’s still beautiful. Not only that, but my hair is beautiful too. And so is Tia Nicole’s, Tia Lay Lay’s, Tia Samantha, Tia Elizabeth, and all the other amazing women she’s blessed to have in her life. 

Hair is something that I’ve never thought so much about until I became pregnant. Knowing my baby will have different hair than me makes me quite cautious. It’ll be a learning experience for me, learning how to care for hair that will be a totally different texture than mine. But I want her to know that she’s beautiful exactly the way she is.